Series Minx & Husky


Part Three: Minx, Series V & VI & Husky, Series III


Minx, Series V
Minx, Series VI
Husky, Series III


Minx, Series V

"If all Britain's family saloons were (mataphorically) shaken together like a cocktail, the concoction would probably turn out something like a Hillman Minx." (The Motor, 6th November, 1963)

The Super Minx was already in production in 1963, but Rootes didn't abandon the Minx. Instead, a restyled and improved version appeared. Continuing the eccentric numbering system which had begun with the Series I, II, III, IIIA, IIIB and IIIC, the new model was not the Series IV, but the Series V. Reviewers seemed pleased with the fact that the Minx had continued to exist:

"Rootes have continued with the policy which began when the first Minx went into production in 1932, and can claim a longer uninterrupted run than any other current model. Year by year, the car has been kept up to date, and nothing is now left of the original, although continuity has never been broken." (The Motor, 4th September, 1963).

It was lower and squarer than its immediate predecessor, the IIIC. The front grille was shallow and flat, with horizontal bars running across it, the front windscreen was flatter and squarer, the rear window no longer curved around the side of the car, and the fins were less pronounced. The size of the wheels was reduced from 15 inches to 13, and disc brakes were now fitted to the front, in addition to the Super Minx suspension.

The same 1592cc engine as the Series IIIC was used, and an automatic option (for 90 extra) was available - not Smith's famous 'Easidrive', but the Borg Warner 35. In some export markets - principally North America - the Super Minx engine was fitted.

Inside, the facia was completely redesigned, with two main dials directly in front of the driver. Separate front seats were now standard.

As before, both single colour and duotone paint finishes were available. Single colour models had a single horizontal side moulding, two-colour models had a narrow double moulding, with the roof colour between them.

The price of the Series V Minx was 634 18s 9d (about 634.95), including Purchase Tax of 109 18s 9d (about 109.95). Its maximum speed was 77.2 m.p.h.

"Few Rootes Group dealers will argue with you if you call the Hillman Minx [Series] V an unadventurous car. But this humblest member of the Rootes 1.6 litre saloon car range sells well - and what's more, Minx buyers often stick to Minxes.

"Among a motoring public that has recently become performance-car conscious, the Minx stands out as one of the few saloons that has made no compromises. It has soaked up detail improvements over the years, yet still offers a type of motoring that can be roughly classified as 'moderation in all things'." (Practical Motorist, April 1965).


[Go to Minx, Series I / Minx, Series II / Husky, Series I / Minx, Series III / Minx, Series IIIA / Minx, Series IIIB / Minx, Series IIIC / Husky, Series II / Minx, Series V / Minx, Series VI / Husky, Series III / The Hillman Page]


Minx, Series VI

[Image: Series VI Minx]

The final Minx, the Series VI, appeared in 1965. "Unbelievable as it may seem," said Autocar (31st December, 1965), "the Hillman Minx will soon be celebrating its 35th birthday, and during its lifetime it must have provided family transport for literally millions. During the war, under its khaki paint, it did service as a staff car. Today there are two versions of the Minx - the Super and the "standard", now called the Series VI."

Changes from the Series V included a 1725cc engine and a new facia, very similar to that of the Imp, with a long, horizontal speedometer, and water temperature and fuel gauges at either end. "Inside," according to Autocar, "the Minx VI has been redesigned by someone who really knows what a driver wants."

The 1725cc engine was basically the same as the 1592cc, but with five main bearings for the crankshaft. At first, the engine was intended to have 65 b.h.p., but in the end this was reduced to 58.5, for reasons of fuel economy. Top speed was nevertheless increased to 82 m.p.h., according to Autocar, most of whose test mileage was done during the coverage of the RAC Rally! In top gear, they said "it does no harm to let it run up into the 90s on down grades for brief spells (when travelling abroad!)."

When it first appeared, it was 20 more expensive than the Series V had been, but including Purchase Tax of 115 2s 1d (about 115.10), the total price came out at 660 2s 1d (about 660.10). The heater, though, was still an extra at 18 2s 6d (about 18.12), as was a radio at 28 3s 8d (about 28.18).

[Image: Series VI Minx]


[Go to Minx, Series I / Minx, Series II / Husky, Series I / Minx, Series III / Minx, Series IIIA / Minx, Series IIIB / Minx, Series IIIC / Husky, Series II / Minx, Series V / Minx, Series VI / Husky, Series III / The Hillman Page]


Husky, Series III

[Image: Series III Husky]

"Like an old house which has been modernized, the Husky III retains a good deal of the original planning." (Autocar, 27th December, 1963).

The Series III Husky came out at the same time as the Series V Minx, and had the same redesigned front end and grille. Otherwise, it remained the same as the Series II on the outside: unlike the Series V Minx, drum brakes were fitted to all four wheels, which were still the 15 inch diameter type.

It retained its 1390cc engine, although the 1592cc Minx engine was fitted for North America. Improved fuel consumption was obtained by fitting a new Zenith 30 VNN carburetter.

Autocar's special test track "was covered with almost exceptional (and unexpected) ease for such a low-priced utility." The price was, in fact, 586 12s 1d (about 586.60), including 101 12s 1d (about 101.60), which made the Husky about 48 cheaper than the Series V Minx.

Inside, the facia was like the Series V Minx, but with slightly simpler equipment.


[Go to Minx, Series I / Minx, Series II / Husky, Series I / Minx, Series III / Minx, Series IIIA / Minx, Series IIIB / Minx, Series IIIC / Husky, Series II / Minx, Series V / Minx, Series VI / Husky, Series III / The Hillman Page]


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